Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)


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Gellar described the show as "the ultimate metaphor: horrors of adolescence manifesting through these actual monsters. It's the hardest time of life. In the first few seasons, the most prominent monsters in the Buffy bestiary are vampires , which are based on traditional myths, lore, and literary conventions. As the series continues, Buffy and her companions fight an increasing variety of demons , as well as ghosts , werewolves , zombies , and unscrupulous humans.

They frequently save the world from annihilation by a combination of physical combat, magic , and detective-style investigation, and are guided by an extensive collection of ancient and mystical reference books. Season one exemplifies the "high school is hell" concept. Buffy Summers has just moved to Sunnydale after burning down her old school's gym, and hopes to escape her Slayer duties.

Her plans are complicated by Rupert Giles , her new Watcher , who reminds her of the inescapable presence of evil. Sunnydale High is built atop a Hellmouth , a portal to demon dimensions that attracts supernatural phenomena to the area. Buffy befriends two schoolmates, Xander Harris and Willow Rosenberg , who help her fight evil throughout the series, but they must first prevent The Master , an ancient and especially threatening vampire, from opening the Hellmouth and taking over Sunnydale.

The emotional stakes are raised in season two. Vampires Spike and Drusilla weakened from a mob in Prague , which, it is implied, caused her debilitating injury , come to town along with a new slayer, Kendra Young , who was activated as a result of Buffy's brief death in the season one finale. Xander becomes involved with Cordelia , while Willow becomes involved with witchcraft and Daniel "Oz" Osbourne , who is a werewolf.

The romantic relationship between Buffy and the vampire Angel develops over the course of the season, but after they have sex, Angel's soul, given to him by a Gypsy curse in the past, is lost, and he once more becomes Angelus, a sadistic killer. Kendra is killed by a restored Drusilla. Angelus torments much of the "Scooby Gang" throughout the rest of the season and murders multiple innocents and Giles' new girlfriend Jenny Calendar , a gypsy who was sent to maintain Angel's curse.

To avert an apocalypse, Buffy is forced to banish Angelus to a demon dimension just moments after Willow has restored his soul. The ordeal leaves Buffy emotionally shattered, and she leaves Sunnydale. After attempting to start a new life in Los Angeles, Buffy returns to town in season three. Angel has mysteriously been released from the demon dimension, but is close to insanity due to the torment he suffered there, and is nearly driven to suicide by the First Evil.

He and Buffy realize that a relationship between them can never happen; he eventually leaves Sunnydale at the end of the season. A new watcher named Wesley is put in Giles' place when Giles is fired from the Watcher's Council because he has developed a "father's love" for Buffy; and towards the end of the season, Buffy announces that she will no longer be working for the Council.

Early in the season, she meets Faith , the Slayer activated after Kendra's death. She also encounters the affable Mayor Richard Wilkins , who secretly has plans to "ascend" become a "pure" demon on Sunnydale High's Graduation Day. Although Faith initially works well with Buffy, she becomes increasingly unstable after accidentally killing a human and forms a relationship with the paternal yet manipulative Mayor, eventually landing in a coma after a fight with Buffy. At the end of the season, after the Mayor becomes a huge snake-like demon, Buffy and the entire graduating class destroy him by blowing up Sunnydale High.

Season four sees Buffy and Willow enroll at UC Sunnydale, while Xander joins the workforce and begins dating Anya , a former vengeance demon. Spike returns as a series regular and is abducted by The Initiative , a top-secret military installation based beneath the UC Sunnydale campus. They implant a microchip in his head that punishes him whenever he tries to harm a human. He makes a truce with the Scooby Gang and begins to fight on their side, purely for the joy of fighting, upon learning that he can still harm other demons.

Oz leaves town after realizing that he is too dangerous as a werewolf, and Willow falls in love with Tara Maclay , another witch. Buffy begins dating Riley Finn , a graduate student and member of The Initiative. Although appearing to be a well-meaning anti-demon operation, The Initiative's sinister plans are revealed when Adam , a monster secretly built from parts of humans, demons and machinery, escapes and begins to wreak havoc on the town. Adam is destroyed by a magical composite of Buffy and her three friends, and The Initiative is shut down.

During season five , a younger sister, Dawn , suddenly appears in Buffy's life; although she is new to the series, to the characters it is as if she has always been there. Buffy is confronted by Glory , an exiled Hell God who is searching for a "Key" that will allow her to return to her Hell dimension and in the process blur the lines between dimensions and unleash Hell on Earth. It is later discovered that the Key's protectors have turned the Key into human form — Dawn — concurrently implanting everybody with lifelong memories of her. The Watcher's Council aids in Buffy's research on Glory, and she and Giles are both reinstated on their own terms.

Riley leaves early in the season after realizing that Buffy does not love him and joins a military demon-hunting operation. Spike, still implanted with the Initiative chip, realizes he is in love with Buffy and increasingly helps the Scoobies in their fight. Buffy's mother Joyce dies of a brain aneurysm , while at the end of the season, Xander proposes to Anya. Glory finally discovers that Dawn is the key and kidnaps her.

To save Dawn, Buffy sacrifices her own life by diving into the portal to the Hell dimension and thus closes it with her death. At the beginning of season six , Buffy has been dead for days, but Buffy's friends resurrect her through a powerful spell, believing they have rescued her from a Hell dimension. Buffy returns in a deep depression, explaining several episodes later that she had been in Heaven and is devastated to be pulled back to Earth.

Giles returns to England because he has concluded that Buffy has become too reliant on him, while Buffy takes up a fast-food job to support herself and Dawn, and develops a secret, mutually abusive relationship with Spike. Dawn suffers from kleptomania and feelings of alienation, Xander leaves Anya at the altar after which she once again becomes a vengeance demon , and Willow becomes addicted to magic, causing Tara to temporarily leave her. They also begin to deal with The Trio , a group of nerds led by Warren Mears who use their proficiency in technology and magic to attempt to kill Buffy and take over Sunnydale.

Warren is shown to be the only competent villain of the group and, after Buffy thwarts his plans multiple times and the Trio breaks apart, he becomes unhinged and attacks Buffy with a gun, accidentally killing Tara in the process. This causes Willow to descend into nihilistic darkness and unleash all of her dark magical powers, killing Warren and attempting to kill his friends. Giles returns to face her in battle and infuses her with light magic, tapping into her remaining humanity.

This overwhelms Willow with guilt and pain, whereupon she attempts to destroy the world to end everyone's suffering, although it eventually allows Xander to reach through her pain and end her rampage. Late in the season, after losing control and trying to rape Buffy, Spike leaves Sunnydale and travels to see a demon and asks him to "return him to what he used to be" so that he can "give Buffy what she deserves".

After Spike passes a series of brutal tests, the demon restores his soul. During season seven , it is revealed that Buffy's second resurrection caused instability that is allowing the First Evil to begin tipping the balance between good and evil. It begins by hunting down and killing inactive Potential Slayers , and soon raises an army of ancient, powerful Turok-Han vampires. After the Watchers' Council is destroyed, a number of Potential Slayers some brought by Giles take refuge in Buffy's house. The Turok-Han vampires and a sinister, misogynistic preacher known as Caleb begin causing havoc for the Scoobies.

As the Hellmouth becomes more active, nearly all of Sunnydale's population — humans and demons alike — flee. In the series finale, Buffy kills Caleb, and Angel returns to Sunnydale with an amulet, which Buffy gives to Spike; the Scoobies then surround the Hellmouth and the Potential Slayers descend into its cavern, while Willow casts a spell that activates their Slayer powers. Anya dies in the fight, as do some of the new Slayers. Spike's amulet channels the power of the sun to destroy the Hellmouth and all the vampires within it, including himself. The collapse of the cavern creates a crater that swallows all of Sunnydale, while the survivors of the battle escape in a school bus.

In the final scene, as the survivors survey the crater, Dawn asks, "What are we going to do now? Writer Joss Whedon says that "Rhonda the Immortal Waitress" was really the first incarnation of the Buffy concept, "the idea of some woman who seems to be completely insignificant who turns out to be extraordinary". The idea was first visited through Whedon's script for the movie Buffy the Vampire Slayer , which featured Kristy Swanson in the title role.

The director, Fran Rubel Kuzui , saw it as a "pop culture comedy about what people think about vampires ". It was crushing. Several years later, Gail Berman later a Fox executive, but at that time President and CEO of the production company Sandollar Television, who owned the TV rights to the movie approached Whedon to develop his Buffy concept into a television series.

The latter promoted the premiere with a series of History of the Slayer clips, [37] and the first episode aired on March 10, Whedon has declared in June that the non-broadcast pilot would not be included with DVDs of the series "while there is strength in these bones", stating that it "sucks on ass". Joss Whedon was credited as executive producer throughout the run of the series, and for the first five seasons — he was also the showrunner , supervising the writing and all aspects of production.

Marti Noxon took on the role for seasons six and seven — , but Whedon continued to be involved with writing and directing Buffy alongside projects such as Angel , Fray , and Firefly. Fran Rubel Kuzui and her husband, Kaz Kuzui , were credited as executive producers [39] but were not involved in the show.

Their credit, rights, and royalties over the franchise relate to their funding, producing, and directing of the original movie version of Buffy. Script-writing was done by Mutant Enemy , a production company created by Whedon in The writers with the most writing credits [41] are Joss Whedon , Steven S.

Jane Espenson has explained how scripts came together. Then the episode's story was "broken" into acts and scenes. Act breaks were designed as key moments to intrigue viewers so that they would stay with the episode following the commercial break. The writers collectively filled in scenes surrounding these act breaks for a more fleshed-out story. A whiteboard marked their progress by mapping brief descriptions of each scene. Once "breaking" was done, the credited author wrote an outline for the episode, which was checked by Whedon or Noxon.

The writer then wrote a full script, which went through a series of drafts, and finally a quick rewrite from the showrunner. The final article was used as the shooting script. Buffy the Vampire Slayer first aired on March 10, , as a mid season replacement for the show Savannah on the WB network , and played a key role in the growth of the Warner Bros. In , the show went into syndication in the United States on local stations and on cable channel FX ; the local airings ended in , and the FX airings lasted until but returned to the network in Beginning in January , it began to air in syndication in the United States on Logo.

Chiller also aired a hour Thanksgiving Day marathon on November 25, While the seventh season was still being broadcast, Sarah Michelle Gellar told Entertainment Weekly she was not going to sign on for an eighth year; "When we started to have such a strong year this year, I thought: 'This is how I want to go out, on top, at our best. From the fourth season onwards, the BBC aired the show in anamorphic widescreen format. Whedon later said that Buffy was never intended to be viewed this way.

In August , Pivot announced that, for the first time, episodes of Buffy would be broadcast in high-definition and in a widescreen format authorized by the studio, but not by any of the series' principals. Other problems included missing filters, editing errors, and poorly re-rendered CGI. Buffy features a mix of original , indie , rock and pop music. The composers spent around seven days scoring between fourteen and thirty minutes of music for each episode. Despite this, their goal was to produce "dramatic" orchestration that would stand up to film scores.

Alongside the score, most episodes featured indie rock music, usually at the characters' venue of choice, The Bronze. Buffy music supervisor John King explained that "we like to use unsigned bands" that "you would believe would play in this place". Alongside these series, Whedon has cited cult film Night of the Comet as a "big influence", [73] and credited the X-Men character Kitty Pryde as a significant influence on the character of Buffy. Buffy episodes often include a deeper meaning or metaphor as well.

Whedon explained, "We think very carefully about what we're trying to say emotionally, politically, and even philosophically while we're writing it In the world of Buffy the problems that teenagers face become literal monsters. A mother can take over her daughter's life " Witch " ; a strict stepfather-to-be really is a heartless machine " Ted " ; a young lesbian fears that her nature is demonic " Goodbye Iowa " and " Family " ; a girl who has sex with even the nicest-seeming guy may discover that he afterward becomes a monster " Innocence ".

The love affair between the vampire Angel and Buffy was fraught with metaphors. For example, their night of passion cost the vampire his soul. Sarah Michelle Gellar said: "That's the ultimate metaphor. You sleep with a guy and he turns bad on you. Buffy struggles throughout the series with her calling as Slayer and the loss of freedom this entails, frequently sacrificing teenage experiences for her Slayer duties.

Her difficulties and eventual empowering realizations are reflections of several dichotomies faced by modern women and echo feminist issues within society. In the episode " Becoming Part 2 ", when Joyce learns that Buffy is the Slayer, her reaction has strong echoes of a parent discovering her child is gay, including denial, suggesting that she tries "not being a Slayer", and ultimately kicking Buffy out of the house. Bianca Lawson , who played vampire slayer Kendra Young in season 2 of the show, originally auditioned for the role of Cordelia Chase before Charisma Carpenter was cast in the role.

After watching her audition, Joss Whedon asked her to come back in and audition for the lead role of Buffy Summers. The character of Angel was only supposed to appear briefly in the pilot episode. When the pilot was due to be reshot in September , scouting for Angel began again, and by chance a talent agent spotted David Boreanaz on the sidewalk walking his dog.

Anthony Stewart Head had already led a prolific acting and singing career, [84] but remained best known in the United States for a series of twelve coffee commercials with Sharon Maughan for Taster's Choice instant coffee. Nicholas Brendon , unlike other Buffy regulars, had little acting experience, instead working various jobs—including production assistant , plumber's assistant, veterinary janitor, food delivery, script delivery, day care counselor, and waiter—before breaking into acting and overcoming his stutter.

Strong later played the role of Jonathan Levinson, a recurring character for much of the series run. Alyson Hannigan was the last of the original six to be cast. Following her role in My Stepmother Is an Alien , [89] she appeared in commercials and supporting roles on television shows throughout the early s. Hannigan described her approach to the character through Willow's reaction to a particular moment: Willow sadly tells Buffy that her Barbie doll was taken from her as a child.

Buffy asks her if she ever got it back. Willow's line was to reply "most of it". Hannigan decided on an upbeat and happy delivery of the line "most of it", as opposed to a sad, depressed delivery. Hannigan figured Willow would be happy and proud that she got "most of it" back. That indicated how she was going to play the rest of the scene, and the role, for that matter, and defined the character.

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The Buffy opening sequence provides credits at the beginning of each episode, with the accompanying music performed by Californian rock band Nerf Herder. In the DVD commentary for the first Buffy episode , Whedon said his decision to go with Nerf Herder's theme was influenced by Hannigan, who had urged him to listen to the band's music. But the theme quickly changes: "It removes itself from the sphere of s and 70s horror by replaying the same motif, the organ now supplanted by an aggressively strummed electric guitar, relocating itself in modern youth culture Buffy has inspired a range of official works, including television shows, books, comics, games, and podcasts.

This expansion of the series encouraged use of the term " Buffyverse " to describe the franchise and the fictional universe in which Buffy and related stories take place. The storyline was continued in a series of comic books produced by Joss Whedon and published by Dark Horse Comics , which serve as a canonical continuation of the television series. Joss Whedon was interested in a film continuation in , [96] but such a film has yet to materialize. In July , 20th Century Fox Television began development on a television reboot of the series.

Monica Owusu-Breen is to serve as showrunner and has been working on the script with Whedon, who is to be an executive producer. At the time of Buffy' s 20th anniversary in , Whedon expressed fear of reboots, commenting that when "something [is brought] back, and even if it's exactly as good as it was, the experience can't be.

You've already experienced it, and part of what was great was going through it for the first time.

You have to meet expectations and adjust it for the climate, which is not easily [done]. The spin-off Angel was introduced in October , at the start of Buffy season four. Like Buffy , it was produced by the production company Mutant Enemy. At times, it performed better in the Nielsen ratings than its parent series did. The series was given a darker tone, focusing on the ongoing trials of Angel in Los Angeles. His character is tormented by guilt following the return of his soul, punishment for more than a century of murder and torture.

During the first four seasons of the show, he works as a private detective in a fictionalized version of Los Angeles, California , where he and his associates work to "help the helpless", to restore the faith and "save the souls" of those who have lost their way. In season five, the Senior Partners of Wolfram and Hart take a bold gamble in their campaign to corrupt Angel, giving him control of their Los Angeles office. Angel accepts the deal as an opportunity to fight evil from the inside. When Glenn Quinn Doyle left the series during its first season, Alexis Denisof Wesley Wyndam-Pryce , who played a recurring character in the last nine episodes of season three of Buffy , took his place.

Angel also continued to appear occasionally on Buffy. Outside of the TV series, the Buffyverse has been officially expanded and elaborated on by authors and artists in the so-called "Buffyverse Expanded Universe ". The creators of these works may or may not keep to established continuity. Similarly, writers for the TV series were under no obligation to use information which had been established by the Expanded Universe, and sometimes contradicted such continuity. Dark Horse has published the Buffy comics since Following the publication of Tales of the Vampires in , Dark Horse Comics halted publication on Buffyverse-related comics and graphic novels.

The company produced Whedon's Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight with forty issues from March to January , picking up where the television show left off—taking the place of an eighth canonical season.

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Dark Horse continued to publish Buffy comics continuing the story after the television show until September when they released the final issue of Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Twelve which intended to bring closure to the series. Following the end of Dark Horse's Buffy series, Boom! Studios acquired the license to publish Buffy comics. Taking a different approach from Dark Horse, Boom! Studios decided to publish a new rebooted Buffy series in with many elements updated to be more contemporary. Roaring Book Press. Read this book! Reynolds may only have added the word "dude" but he does it well.

And Dan Santat's illustrations are glorious, bright, bold, and colorful. This one is rollicking good fun and will have kids laughing out loud. Platypus and Beaver are surfer dudes trying to catch the 'big one'. They do, only it's a big, sad shark who just wants to be included. The two cheer up Shark with an ice cream and then get the bright idea of letting him in on their totally gnarly surfing session.

Hilarity ensues. From the cover to the last "dude" this one will circulate constantly, and each circulation will bring joy and giggles to the reader. Stead, Philip. All the Animals Where I Live. The author, who used to be a city dweller, takes the reader on a tour around his home in the country and introduces all the animals that surround him from his dog, the birds, and the coyotes to his stuffed bear and quilted chickens.

Tetri, Emily. Tiger vs. First Second. Tiger has a monster under her bed. Tiger brings Monster food and they play games together. Now Tiger and Monster must work together to get rid of the nightmare. Tetri tells this adorable tale of friendship, empathy, and bravery in graphic novel format and her clever use of bright, warm colors when Tiger is feeling safe and happy and dark colors for the nightmares visually enhance the story. This Geisel Honor empowers young readers to be brave and face their fears. How to Knit a Monster. Greta the goat is a knitter, not just any kind of knitter, a sock knitter.

One day Greta decides to try knitting something new and is having fun making little knit goats when Mrs. Sheep comes along and brags that she is a much better knitter than Greta. Greta must use her quick wit and talent for knitting to save the day. Bold and unconventional illustrations help make this quirky story a success. Now he is threatening to unleash an army of moths to eat all of the books in the world unless he gets one billion trillion dollars.

Who could possibly be clever enough and love books enough to foil the Doctor and save all of those books? Lyric saves the day and the world by knowing what book to give to whom and when to give it. Great book for the beginning of the school year introduction to the power of books and the library. It would also be great addition to a lesson on how to find a just-right book. Cleverly written and fantastically funny, this book is an ode to the superpowers of professional librarians and a just-right book!

Redemption

Yelchin, Eugene. In this adorable and funny wordless picture book a freshly hatched curious baby chick sets out to explore the world. When she pecks pup on the nose, his startled bark sends her right back into her shell. Bright, eye-catching illustrations tell a cute and funny story of empathy, friendship, and discovery. A perfect fit for a friends storytime.

Zietlow Miller, Pat. Be Kind. Tanisha spills grape juice on her new dress, and while others in the class laugh about it, the main character remembers what her mom told her about kindness. This book shows many ways that kindness can spread from person to person. Becker, Helaine. Counting on Katherine. Counting on Katherine is the perfect combination of a picture book with relatively simple sentences that still gets a lot of information to the reader.

An amazing woman. An excellent book for any library. Elliott, David. In the Past. This is not a whimsical collection but realistic and informative. The illustrations are as large and realistic as the object they portray. Together this is the perfect combination of science and art. Can be used in poetry units and science units on dinosaurs. Hale, Chrissy. A concept book about water and land for early readers, this is a sturdy, large format offering for the STEAM curriculum.

Images depicting land and water change as needed. The simple text is easily understood by young readers with illustrations of yellow and blue that support the text. This is a unique information book for the very young. Hannigan, Kate. A Lady Has the Floor. Belva Lockwood believed in equality, not just for women but for all people.

Lockwood fought to not only be one of the first women in the U. She was the first woman to run for President. A necessary addition to nonfiction picture book collections about women who paved the way, but whose names have been lost in the recording of HIStory. Hesselberth, Joyce. Mapping Sam. Greenwillow Books. An endearing story about a nocturnal cat quickly becomes an educational opportunity. As the reader follows Sam on his nightly neighborhood tours and stargazing, the picture book turns into 32 pages of STEM worthy scientific observations.

Readers will view and learn about the compass, maps, graphs, the solar system, and other topics. Hirsch, Rebecca. Millbrook Press. In this 56 page book, the reader is given a crash course on the plight of the monarch butterfly. Author Hirsch offers information, statistics, and reasons why this most recognizable insect is in danger of becoming extinct and what citizens of all ages can do to help. Color photos and graphs support the information offered. Use this STEAM offering in units about insects, climate change, endangered species, and the importance of citizen scientists.

Kaner, Etta. Kids Can Press. Ever wonder where architects get their inspiration? This is a fascinating look at how nature can influence design and how design can influence nature. Leedy, Loreen. Step by Step. Holiday House. This sweet and simple book introduces young readers to different animal tracks in a fun and engaging guessing game format. The book starts out with familiar animals such as a puppy and duckling but later introduces readers to more unusual animals like an armadillo pup and an ostrich chick.

There is also back matter with more information about each animal print. A perfect and interactive addition to a pre-k animal storytime. Montgomery, Sy. The Hyena Scientist. Sy Montgomery and Nic Bishop have done it again! This noted pair of scientists have introduced young scientists to creatures both lovely, the snow leopards of Mongolia, and the scary, great white sharks. This time they have chosen an animal few of us know much about, hyenas. Not known for being kind, cuddly, or pretty, with the help of Montgomery and Bishop, the reader will be fascinated and in awe of this animal. This is a must for all collections.

Nobleman, Marc Tyler. Little is written of Nobuo Fujita who bombed the forests over Brookings Oregon in an attempt to set fire to the forests and cause chaos. It did not work, but affected both the pilot of the plane and the town of Brookings long after the war ended. With easy text and watercolor and mixed media illustrations, Nobleman and illustrator Melissa Iwai bring to light a little known moment of history with their picture book; it could be used with units on World War II, forgiveness, and friendship. Paschkis, Julie. Vivid: Poems and Notes About Colors. Henry Holt. With its bright, geometric cover, this book is hard to miss.

Author Paschkis offers all sorts of information on the art and science of color through verse and informational notes. Use this in units on poetry and in art classes.. Poliquin, Rachel. Loads of facts about an amazing animal presented in a kid friendly, laugh-out-loud manner. Cartoon-style illustrations will lure even the most reluctant reader to take a look. This is the first in a series for middle grade readers. Sayre, April Pulley. Both a thank you to our Earth and a call to action for young readers to become environmental activists.

A simple yet powerful picture book needed in all units dealing with environmental issues. Science and art for young readers. Schmidt, Gary D. So Tall Within. Schmidt artfully tells the life story of Sojourner Truth - her life as a slave and a mother and her courageous fight for freedom. This is a story of strength and perseverance told on a backdrop of beautiful paintings by Daniel Minter. Seluk, Nick. Orchard Books. The author uses humor, fun illustrations and facts to explain the Sun's role in keeping our solar system together. This book will foster great discussions as each page is read and may pique interest in kids who want to seek further information about our solar system.

Stone, Tanya Lee. What a crooked and complicated history for a beloved board game. This book shares the remarkable and overlooked story of Lizzie Magic, the brainchild behind the game of what is now Monopoly. She received a patent for her idea, and tried to sell it to Parker Brothers, who turned her down. People liked the game so much they used to make their own boards, and soon enough a man, Charles Darrow, created his own version of the board. Fascinating narrative nonfiction for the younger reader.

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An anthology of graphic biographies of twenty-nine extraordinary women throughout history. Bagieu has selected women from all over the globe and all throughout time and highlighted their lives. Each of the women who was selected did something extraordinary, though many of them have been forgotten or had their accomplishments diminished in favor of their beauty or some other quality. Brown, Don. The Unwanted: Stories of the Syrian Refugees. Don Brown, known for his picture book biographies, has of late turned to historical events, The Great American Dust Bowl and Drowned City and given them story in graphic novel form.

He has outdone himself in his latest book about the Syrian refugee crisis. The heartbreaking and courageous stories of why and how the Syrians and all refugees seek a better life and what they are willing to risk for freedom. Green, Laci. Harper Collins. If you have questions, this book has answers! Laci Green, known for her Sex Plus series on YouTube, has been involved in advocacy and sex education work since high school. This book covers it all in a healthy, non-judgemental, sex-positive tone that will appeal to young adults.

Green points out many times that she is not a medical professional, however, the book was fact-checked by two doctors and an expert on human sexuality. Resources are listed for each section at the back of the book, as well as an index. Graph, illustrations, and bullet points are used to highlight information and make the text very friendly for teen readers.

Guerrero, Diane. Her personal account is filled with happy family moments, celebrations, love of family, community and country along with the determination of not only her family , but others like theirs, to be hard working and lawful members of the country they hoped to be citizens of. At the back of the book there are sources listed where the reader can learn more about the immigration reform debate being held in the United States and how the reader can get involved, if interested. Hoose, Phillip. Farrar Straus Giroux. Using newspaper articles, photographs, and personal interviews, Hoose tells a compelling story of race, sport, and triumph in the face of adversity.

The book revolves around the high school basketball scene in Indiana in the s and 50s. Hoose centers his story at Crispus Attucks High School, an all-black school in Indianapolis that built a powerful, championship-caliber team that eventually helped force the integration of the basketball scene. This book will appeal to fans of narrative nonfiction and to those who appreciate reading about a group of people whose mantra became "Respect all, but back down from no one. Jarrow, Gail. Calkins Creek Books. Well documented and the illustrations beautifully portray the story of an alien invasion and strategically placed throughout.

Judge, Lita. While working through her own demons, Lita Judge leaves the world of picture books,to write about a young girl who fought her own dark demons. Raised to embrace free love and communal living, young, willful Mary falls for Percy Bysshe Shelley, who was already married. Together they run off to what Mary hopes will be a life of adventure and excitement. Instead, they are spurned by family and friend alike.

Mary has two monsters - one in book form and the one she carries within. In six parts of free verse, Judge makes the reader feel Mary's emotional state as she lives with Shelley, but it is her dark, dramatic illustrations that pull the reader into Mary's life. This graphic novel is haunting, terrifying and breathtaking in its rendering. Krosoczka, Jarrett J. Hey, Kiddo. His mom was a drug addict, and he doesn't know his father at all. Due to his mother's addiction, he's raised by his colorful grandparents, who despite gruff exteriors are willing to do whatever it takes to support Jarrett's knack for art.

Krosoczka's memoir blends the art of graphic novel with fascinating artifacts from his childhood - photo booth photos, birth records, notes from his troubled mom. Saedi, Sara. In her humorous memoir, Saedi recollects her years as an average teenager worrying about acne, dreaming about becoming a celebrity, and obsessing over her crushes, all the while living as an undocumented immigrant. Saedi begins her story with background of Iran, explaining why her family left Tehran in the middle of the Islamic Revolution, but much of the book is about her teen years.

In between her stories of adolescent angst, Saedi explains why Iranians keep watering cans in their bathrooms, the Persian custom of arguing over the check, and Iranian Wedding Traditions. This memoir will appeal to a large audience. Readers will learn about Iranian history and traditions, and the universal experience of being a teenager in the U.

Swanson, James L. Scholastic Press. A profound read for students of history who are eager to learn the whole story, including what the textbooks leave out. Thrash, Maggie. Lost Soul, Be at Peace. Thrash tackles her past with brutal honesty in images and words. Set a year and a half after Honor Girl , Maggie is depressed and failing most of her classes. She wants her parents to notice her troubles, but her mother avoids the signs and her father remains distant and absorbed in his work.

Maggie is haunted by a ghost, Tommy, her only confidante. Voiklis, Charlotte Jones and Lena Roy. Becoming Madeleine. Farrar Straus Giroux for Young Readers. This is the best biography that I have read. It is filled with photos, report cards, quotes, and love. The girls interviewed family members, raided photo albums, journals, and collaborated. Quote from Madeleine L. It helped put things into perspective. And now that I am older, I still do that. I've never had to lose my younger selves- so that's why I am every age I have ever been.

The reading level is geared for middle school, but the work continues on to adults. Acevedo, Elizabeth. The Poet X. Harper Teen. This is a compelling and emotional novel in verse about a teenage girl from Harlem discovering herself through her writing and slam poetry. Xiomara copes with harassment, bullying, and the strictness of her upbringing with her fists, though she has so much to say to the pages of her leather-bound notebook. The ending is happy but messy, and will leave readers satisfied by the poignancy and realness of the story.

Adeyemi, Toni. Children of Blood and Bone. Multilayered characters grapple with issues of agency and power, loyalty and shame as the novel is narrated in alternating chapters. Vivid descriptions of the setting and the concepts of the maji balance nicely with well-paced battle and action sequences that will leave readers aching for the main trio of characters and anxiously awaiting the second volume. Alameda, Courtney. Pitch Dark. Tuck Morgan is a member of the crew of the U.

John Muir , and he has been for years. In the process of transporting a chunk of Earth from their dying planet, the spaceship is sabotaged and the crew can only survive by going into stasis.

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While Tuck is someone out of the past, Laura Cruz is very much in the present. Laura is from a family of archeologists, searching through space, trying to find shipwrecks and rescue relics from Earth's shattered past. When Laura's ship happens upon the John Muir, it seems like a boon for both crews. When an onboard terrorist crashes the Cruz ship into the Muir, things get very interesting, and Tuck and Laura work together to try to save both themselves, the family, and the treasures.

All the pieces fit together very well in a story full of suspense and danger! Albertalli, Becky. Leah on the Offbeat. The colors used to live in harmony, then one color declared superiority and the colors divided into their own neighborhoods. When two colors decide to take the plunge and merge, new colors form and everyone learns that mixing is happier than dividing. This book does what excellent picture books do, distills a complex issue into an understandable visual that any child can grasp. This will have wide circulation appeal and will make a wonderful read aloud.

Clark-Robinson, Marcia. Let the Children March. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. This fictionalized account of the Children's March of May in Alabama brings awareness to this first ever youth civil rights event. Both author and illustrator bring the reader to the March and let them experience the tenacity of the children and the treatment they received.

End papers offer a timeline of the events both before and after the March. Back pages include sources, factual remarks, and a bibliography. This picture book of historical fiction needs to be shared by all. Add this to units of civil rights, black history and the importance of young voices. Cole, Rachel. Mousie, I will Read to You. A warm and loving ode to the power of words, sharing stories and the simplicity of raising a reader.

The story follows a little mouse and his mother as she first introduces Mousie to stories and poems, shares her love of reading, and then watches Mousie take ownership of his own reading and begin the cycle again with his own little mousie. Davies, Nicola. The Day the War Came. A little girl leads a normal, happy life, but when the war comes, she loses everything and is forced to flee to a new land. Here she is lost and has no place, symbolized by a classroom that has no chair for her.

But she is noticed by a little boy who finds her a chair and brings her into the circle, held in safety and community. Gentle, yet expressive, illustrations from Rebecca Cobb beautifully accompany this must-buy. Our narrator, a little girl, watches as Zola, her new neighbor, moves into the neighborhood. She hesitates to initiate a friendship as she imagines Zola already has a friend - her elephant. This story of imagination, friendship, and play will engage the reader from the first sentence. Greig, Louise.

The Night Box. Clarion Books. As the day ends and Max gets ready for bed, everything seems to be waiting. Waiting as Max gets into his pajamas, waiting as he closes the curtains, waiting as he crawls into bed and kisses his mother good night. Waiting for Max to take out his key and and open the night box. As the box is opened the day slips in and all of the sights and sounds and wonders of night tumble out and across the world.

The language in this story is rich and melodic in its description of the sights and sounds of both day and night. A clever, calm, and imaginative bedtime story for those afraid of the dark. Heos, Bridget. Henry Holt and Company. What makes a stegosaurus a stegothesaurus? The amusing, entertaining, and silly way he speaks. A clever, fun and playful introduction to the thesaurus and a great read aloud to share with writers learning to revise their work. Hesse, Karen. Night Job. It is Friday night and a little boy is going to work with his dad, a school custodian.

The illustrations are soft, simple with grayscales and shading to give the feeling of night. A story that offers discussion into how everyday experiences can become special because of who you share them with and what parents and caregivers do for work. John, Jory. Giraffe Problems. Random House. Giraffe does not like his neck and he has a long list of reasons why. It is too long, too bendy, and everyone stares at it. He wishes he had a neck like a zebra or a lion or even an elephant. Giraffe mopes and grumbles about his neck until he meets a turtle who helps him see things very differently.

A fantastic and funny read aloud, sure to have your students laughing as well as looking at things from a different point of view. I Walk With Vanessa. Beautiful ink and watercolor illustrations form this wordless picture book about diversity, bullying, and kindness. A sweet girl observes the new girl being bullied and shunned by others and comes up with a great way to make the new girl feel welcome and part of the group. This book lends itself to great discussions about diversity, bullies, and kindness to others. Kuefler, Joseph. The Digger and the Flower. Big trucks Crane, Dozer, and Digger work together to build lots of different things like roads, bridges, and tall buildings but when Digger finds a tiny flower in the rubble, things change.

Instead of going to work with the other big trucks, Digger cares for the flower. Soon an entire city is built up around Digger and the flower. The other trucks need the space to keep building and cut the flower down. Digger is heartbroken but soon a new idea is planted. This story is a new and gentle perspective for the truck-loving crowd. Lloyd-Jones, Sally. Goldfish on Vacation. This charming and clever story begins with the prospect of a dull and ordinary summer for three siblings, H, Little O, and Baby Em.

However, when a man comes to clean the old fountain across the street and turns it into a goldfish vacation destination, it leads to an adventure. H, Little O, and Baby Em join with the neighborhood children in dropping off their goldfish and begin a summer filled with new friends, fish, and fun.

This wonderful community-building tale is based on the true story of the refurbishing and creative repurposing of the Hamilton fountain in New York City. Love, Jessica. Candlewick Press. T Grades K On his way home with his abuela, Julian notices three women dressed as beautiful mermaids. Julian loves mermaids and dreams of becoming one. While Abuela is taking a bath, Julian uses palm fronds, flowers, and a lacy curtain to dress up like a mermaid.

He is admiring himself when he gets caught. The soothing illustrations and sparse words perfectly match this beautiful, simple story with a powerful message of kindness, compassion, and courage to be yourself. Marino, Gianna. If I had a Horse. Roaring Brook Press. Not only does the child imagine what life would be like to own a horse but also how they would become friends and bring out the best in each other. Sure to be a hit among your day dreamers and horse lovers. Martinez-Neal, Juana. Grades K Alma is a little girl with a very long name and she is not altogether happy about it.

She asks her father for the story of her name and, after learning about each person after whom she is named, she decides that her name is just right. A story that celebrates the diversity and stories that each of us offer to the world. A wonderful book to share with children who are curious about their own name and heritage. Softly colored illustrations accompany this lovely, empowering text.

Morales, Yuyi. Neal Porter. She is met with unkind words and a lack of understanding in how things work until she finds a library. Brightly-hued illustration give support to the story. Morales has also included a list of the books which inspired her. Discussions on immigration, language, libraries make this a selection with many uses. Penfold, Alexandra. All Are Welcome. Alfred A. With simple, rhyming text and bright illustrations, Penfold and Kaufman have created a diverse, welcoming, harmonious school setting in which children of all skin colors and abilities and cultural backgrounds can learn and share.

This is the world that we wish our children lived in and should be a goal of all adults working with and reading to youngsters. The book does include a double-page fold out which will need to be handled carefully, but the reveal is so joyous, it is worth buying once and then again if it ever rips. From the end pages to the cover, every detail is thought through. A wonderful read-aloud and essential for all library collections. Quinn, David. Go To Sleep, Little Creep.

Crown Books for Young Readers. Perfect for a Halloween read aloud or any old bedtime where a good baby monster is appreciated. She even manages to capture a feeling of diversity within some of the monster families. The page of terrible things baby monsters dream of is worth the price of the book. Ray, Mary Lyn. The Thank You Book. Simple text explains the full possibilities of this phrase, and pencil and watercolor illustrations by Stephanie Graegin pair beautifully to illustrate a cozy world that can be used to begin a discussion on gratitude.

A book that demonstrates kindness and civility in a world that could use more of both. Recommended for public libraries as well as school and classroom libraries. Reynolds, Aaron. Roaring Book Press. Read this book! Reynolds may only have added the word "dude" but he does it well. And Dan Santat's illustrations are glorious, bright, bold, and colorful.

This one is rollicking good fun and will have kids laughing out loud. Platypus and Beaver are surfer dudes trying to catch the 'big one'. They do, only it's a big, sad shark who just wants to be included. The two cheer up Shark with an ice cream and then get the bright idea of letting him in on their totally gnarly surfing session. Hilarity ensues. From the cover to the last "dude" this one will circulate constantly, and each circulation will bring joy and giggles to the reader. Stead, Philip. All the Animals Where I Live. The author, who used to be a city dweller, takes the reader on a tour around his home in the country and introduces all the animals that surround him from his dog, the birds, and the coyotes to his stuffed bear and quilted chickens.

Tetri, Emily. Tiger vs. First Second. Tiger has a monster under her bed. Tiger brings Monster food and they play games together. Now Tiger and Monster must work together to get rid of the nightmare. Tetri tells this adorable tale of friendship, empathy, and bravery in graphic novel format and her clever use of bright, warm colors when Tiger is feeling safe and happy and dark colors for the nightmares visually enhance the story.

This Geisel Honor empowers young readers to be brave and face their fears. How to Knit a Monster. Greta the goat is a knitter, not just any kind of knitter, a sock knitter. One day Greta decides to try knitting something new and is having fun making little knit goats when Mrs. Sheep comes along and brags that she is a much better knitter than Greta.

Greta must use her quick wit and talent for knitting to save the day. Bold and unconventional illustrations help make this quirky story a success. Now he is threatening to unleash an army of moths to eat all of the books in the world unless he gets one billion trillion dollars.

Who could possibly be clever enough and love books enough to foil the Doctor and save all of those books? Lyric saves the day and the world by knowing what book to give to whom and when to give it. Great book for the beginning of the school year introduction to the power of books and the library. It would also be great addition to a lesson on how to find a just-right book. Cleverly written and fantastically funny, this book is an ode to the superpowers of professional librarians and a just-right book! Yelchin, Eugene. In this adorable and funny wordless picture book a freshly hatched curious baby chick sets out to explore the world.

When she pecks pup on the nose, his startled bark sends her right back into her shell. Bright, eye-catching illustrations tell a cute and funny story of empathy, friendship, and discovery. A perfect fit for a friends storytime. Zietlow Miller, Pat. Be Kind. Tanisha spills grape juice on her new dress, and while others in the class laugh about it, the main character remembers what her mom told her about kindness. This book shows many ways that kindness can spread from person to person.

Becker, Helaine. Counting on Katherine. Counting on Katherine is the perfect combination of a picture book with relatively simple sentences that still gets a lot of information to the reader. An amazing woman. An excellent book for any library. Elliott, David. In the Past. This is not a whimsical collection but realistic and informative. The illustrations are as large and realistic as the object they portray. Together this is the perfect combination of science and art. Can be used in poetry units and science units on dinosaurs.

Hale, Chrissy. A concept book about water and land for early readers, this is a sturdy, large format offering for the STEAM curriculum. Images depicting land and water change as needed. The simple text is easily understood by young readers with illustrations of yellow and blue that support the text. This is a unique information book for the very young.

Hannigan, Kate. A Lady Has the Floor. Belva Lockwood believed in equality, not just for women but for all people. Lockwood fought to not only be one of the first women in the U. She was the first woman to run for President. A necessary addition to nonfiction picture book collections about women who paved the way, but whose names have been lost in the recording of HIStory. Hesselberth, Joyce. Mapping Sam. Greenwillow Books. An endearing story about a nocturnal cat quickly becomes an educational opportunity.

As the reader follows Sam on his nightly neighborhood tours and stargazing, the picture book turns into 32 pages of STEM worthy scientific observations. Readers will view and learn about the compass, maps, graphs, the solar system, and other topics.

Hirsch, Rebecca. Millbrook Press. In this 56 page book, the reader is given a crash course on the plight of the monarch butterfly. Author Hirsch offers information, statistics, and reasons why this most recognizable insect is in danger of becoming extinct and what citizens of all ages can do to help. Color photos and graphs support the information offered. Use this STEAM offering in units about insects, climate change, endangered species, and the importance of citizen scientists. Kaner, Etta.

Kids Can Press. Ever wonder where architects get their inspiration? This is a fascinating look at how nature can influence design and how design can influence nature. Leedy, Loreen. Step by Step. Holiday House. This sweet and simple book introduces young readers to different animal tracks in a fun and engaging guessing game format. The book starts out with familiar animals such as a puppy and duckling but later introduces readers to more unusual animals like an armadillo pup and an ostrich chick. There is also back matter with more information about each animal print.

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A perfect and interactive addition to a pre-k animal storytime. Montgomery, Sy. The Hyena Scientist. Sy Montgomery and Nic Bishop have done it again! This noted pair of scientists have introduced young scientists to creatures both lovely, the snow leopards of Mongolia, and the scary, great white sharks. This time they have chosen an animal few of us know much about, hyenas. Not known for being kind, cuddly, or pretty, with the help of Montgomery and Bishop, the reader will be fascinated and in awe of this animal.

This is a must for all collections. Nobleman, Marc Tyler. Little is written of Nobuo Fujita who bombed the forests over Brookings Oregon in an attempt to set fire to the forests and cause chaos. It did not work, but affected both the pilot of the plane and the town of Brookings long after the war ended. With easy text and watercolor and mixed media illustrations, Nobleman and illustrator Melissa Iwai bring to light a little known moment of history with their picture book; it could be used with units on World War II, forgiveness, and friendship.

Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3) Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)
Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3) Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)
Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3) Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)
Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3) Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)
Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3) Redemption (A Lacey Hannigan Novel Book 3)

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